a penetrating statement

scott, 25

professional singer

arts administrator

amateur photographer

in a committed relationship with books

anarchist

the opinions on this blog are my own and do not reflect those of any other individual or organization

I have literally never hated singing anything as much as I hate singing this. It’s so bad. #karljenkins (at FSBC - Freemason Street Baptist Church)

I have literally never hated singing anything as much as I hate singing this. It’s so bad. #karljenkins (at FSBC - Freemason Street Baptist Church)

ouroborosian:

sorayachemaly:

This should be posted in school hallways.

I’m unfollowing anyone who reblogs this without negative comments under it. This is such bullshit for so many reasons. A thousand times no. This implies male victims of rape don’t exist. It implies that virtually all men aren’t disgusted with rape, which they fucking are! It implies that most women don’t also find periods disgusting and that therefore any men who are grossed out by it are sexist. Fuck this shit!

ouroborosian:

sorayachemaly:

This should be posted in school hallways.

I’m unfollowing anyone who reblogs this without negative comments under it. This is such bullshit for so many reasons. A thousand times no. This implies male victims of rape don’t exist. It implies that virtually all men aren’t disgusted with rape, which they fucking are! It implies that most women don’t also find periods disgusting and that therefore any men who are grossed out by it are sexist. Fuck this shit!

(via whakahekeheke)

at FSBC - Freemason Street Baptist Church

at FSBC - Freemason Street Baptist Church

rtrixie:

In the post you’re about to make, replace cis/white/hetero/male people with the Jews and if the result sounds like something that could be straight out of Mein Kampf, you should probably reconsider your social justice blogging habits.

(via haereticum)

thefreelioness:

staff:

Happy National Voter Registration Day, Tumblr.
The number one way of celebrating it? Registering to vote.
Every year, millions of eligible Americans neglect to register, which means that millions of important voices are utterly silent on Election Day. Don’t be one of them. There’s basically a 100% chance that something you care about is on the ballot, something you don’t want to be quiet about.
So be one of the loud ones. Register already. It’s an easy form that you already know all the answers to. No excuses.

The U.S. government does not represent the interests of the majority of the country’s citizens, but is instead ruled by those of the rich and powerful, a new study from Princeton and Northwestern universities has concluded.
The report, “Testing Theories of American Politics: Elites, Interest Groups, and Average Citizens" (PDF), used extensive policy data collected between 1981 and 2002 to empirically determine the state of the U.S. political system.
After sifting through nearly 1,800 U.S. policies enacted in that period and comparing them to the expressed preferences of average Americans (50th percentile of income), affluent Americans (90th percentile), and large special interests groups, researchers concluded that the U.S. is dominated by its economic elite.
The peer-reviewed study, which will be taught at these universities in September, says: “The central point that emerges from our research is that economic elites and organized groups representing business interests have substantial independent impacts on US government policy, while mass-based interest groups and average citizens have little or no independent influence.”
Researchers concluded that U.S. government policies rarely align with the preferences of the majority of Americans, but do favour special interests and lobbying organizations: “When a majority of citizens disagrees with economic elites and/or with organized interests, they generally lose. Moreover, because of the strong status quo bias built into the US political system, even when fairly large majorities of Americans favour policy change, they generally do not get it.”
The positions of powerful interest groups are “not substantially correlated with the preferences of average citizens,” but the politics of average Americans and affluent Americans sometimes does overlap. This is merely a coincidence, the report says, with the interests of the average American being served almost exclusively when it also serves those of the richest 10%.
The theory of “biased pluralism” that the Princeton and Northwestern researchers believe the U.S. system fits holds that policy outcomes “tend to tilt towards the wishes of corporations and business and professional associations.”
(Source)

The difference between a democracy and a dictatorship is that in a democracy you vote first and take orders later; in a dictatorship you don’t have to waste your time voting.
- Charles Bukowski

thefreelioness:

staff:

Happy National Voter Registration Day, Tumblr.

The number one way of celebrating it? Registering to vote.

Every year, millions of eligible Americans neglect to register, which means that millions of important voices are utterly silent on Election Day. Don’t be one of them. There’s basically a 100% chance that something you care about is on the ballot, something you don’t want to be quiet about.

So be one of the loud ones. Register already. It’s an easy form that you already know all the answers to. No excuses.

The U.S. government does not represent the interests of the majority of the country’s citizens, but is instead ruled by those of the rich and powerful, a new study from Princeton and Northwestern universities has concluded.

The report, “Testing Theories of American Politics: Elites, Interest Groups, and Average Citizens" (PDF), used extensive policy data collected between 1981 and 2002 to empirically determine the state of the U.S. political system.

After sifting through nearly 1,800 U.S. policies enacted in that period and comparing them to the expressed preferences of average Americans (50th percentile of income), affluent Americans (90th percentile), and large special interests groups, researchers concluded that the U.S. is dominated by its economic elite.

The peer-reviewed study, which will be taught at these universities in September, says: “The central point that emerges from our research is that economic elites and organized groups representing business interests have substantial independent impacts on US government policy, while mass-based interest groups and average citizens have little or no independent influence.”

Researchers concluded that U.S. government policies rarely align with the preferences of the majority of Americans, but do favour special interests and lobbying organizations: “When a majority of citizens disagrees with economic elites and/or with organized interests, they generally lose. Moreover, because of the strong status quo bias built into the US political system, even when fairly large majorities of Americans favour policy change, they generally do not get it.”

The positions of powerful interest groups are “not substantially correlated with the preferences of average citizens,” but the politics of average Americans and affluent Americans sometimes does overlap. This is merely a coincidence, the report says, with the interests of the average American being served almost exclusively when it also serves those of the richest 10%.

The theory of “biased pluralism” that the Princeton and Northwestern researchers believe the U.S. system fits holds that policy outcomes “tend to tilt towards the wishes of corporations and business and professional associations.”

(Source)

The difference between a democracy and a dictatorship is that in a democracy you vote first and take orders later; in a dictatorship you don’t have to waste your time voting.
- Charles Bukowski

(via haereticum)

Today, my 17-year-old son, Thomas, starts work at his first paid job outside of his home. He’s earning the minimum wage (and he had absolutely no problem finding a job). Without minimum-wage legislation, Thomas’s wage rate would likely be lower. He is likely a beneficiary of minimum-wage legislation.

Yet Thomas’s good fortune on the wage front comes at the expense of unknown strangers somewhere who are kept unemployed by minimum-wage legislation. At the artificially higher price per hour of labor, employers cannot afford to employ as many low-skilled workers as they would otherwise employ (or the work conditions and other terms of employment for these faceless strangers who do have jobs are made worse by minimum-wage legislation).

The sad irony is that Thomas doesn’t need an artificially higher wage as much as many now-unemployed strangers need the sub-minimum-wage pay that they would have earned (along with work experience) had the state not priced these workers out of jobs. Thomas is a white, private-school-educated kid from a leafy, wealthy suburb – and each of his parents has multiple graduate degrees and earns high pay. He, and teenagers like him, are among the last low-skilled workers to be priced out of jobs by minimum-wage legislation. Kids such as Thomas (and their middle- and upper-class families) almost certainly are net beneficiaries of minimum-wage legislation, while the huge and cruel damage done by such legislation is inflicted on people much poorer.

Money is only a tool. It will take you wherever you wish, but it will not replace you as the driver.

—Ayn Rand (via moralanarchism)

adrieldaniel:

"Beautiful nudes made it possible for us to contemplate our sexuality in safety."

-Martha Mayer Erlebacher

(via iio0oii)

wearestill:



Sheikh Zayed Mosque, Abu Dhabi: Inlaid flowers wind across the mosque’s 183,000-square-foot marble courtyard.
Photograph by Dave Yoder, National Geographic

wearestill:

(via helloimnolan)